Interoperability

Portrait of Matthew Rahn

ONC’s Cures Act Final Rule Sets Path for New Healthcare Industry Standards

Matthew Rahn | May 6, 2021

Time flies! It has been over a year since ONC’s Cures Act Final Rule was first released and since then ONC has been busy advancing the United States Core Data for Interoperability (USCDI) and enabling the healthcare industry to voluntarily implement newer versions of adopted standards via the Standards Version Advancement Process (SVAP) for the purposes of the ONC Health IT Certification.

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Portrait of Tracy Okubo

Sync for Genes Phase 4 Demonstrations Selected

Tracy Okubo | April 21, 2021

Today, ONC is pleased to announce two demonstration sites selected for Sync for Genes Phase 4. Since its launch in 2017, the ONC Sync for Genes project has advanced the standardized sharing of genomic information between laboratories, providers, patients, and researchers. Sync for Genes uses the Health Level 7 (HL7®) International FHIR® standard to enable the electronic sharing of genomic data.  

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Portrait of Brittney Boakye

Standards Beyond the Clinic: Capturing Patient Health Data to Advance Precision Medicine

Brittney Boakye | January 26, 2021

Does the neighborhood I live in affect my health? How am I going to be able to see the specialist without a car? Can I share blood pressure and blood sugar readings I take at home with my doctor so she can monitor how I’m doing? These critical questions have helped to drive precision medicine research as well as improving care management and coordination.

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Portrait of Allison Dennis

Labs on FHIR: Sharing Genetic Test Results

Allison Dennis | January 7, 2021

The use of genetic testing is becoming increasingly routine in patient care. For example, tests are available to check newborns for genetic disorders, screen would-be parents for carrier status, inform cancer care, and evaluate potential pharmacogenetic associations. However, the laboratories that perform these tests face many challenges that keep them from being able to return clinical genomic results in a standardized way and fully leverage a patient’s electronic health record. This also affects healthcare professionals’ ability to deliver precision medicine and conduct precision medicine research.

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