Can I use donated goods or services to meet a matching or cost sharing requirement?

Unless the funding opportunity announcement specifies that matching or cost sharing may consist only of cash contributions, you may use the value of donated goods or services to meet all or part of a matching or cost-sharing requirement. The value of donated services must be based on the type of service provided and rates you pay for similar services or that are paid in the open market. For example, if a doctor volunteers as an intake coordinator, those services cannot be valued at what a doctor charges per hour. The value assigned to donated supplies must be reasonable and cannot exceed the fair market value of the supplies at the time of donation. The value of donated equipment cannot exceed the fair market value of equipment of the same age and condition at the time of donation. The value of loaned equipment cannot exceed its fair rental value.

If any part of the donated property was acquired with Federal funds, only the non-Federal share of the property may be counted as matching or cost sharing. See 45 CFR 74.23 or 92.24, as applicable, for additional information concerning third-party in-kind contributions.

Content last reviewed on November 14, 2013
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