Authors

Dr. Karen B. DeSalvo

Portrait of Dr. Karen B. DeSalvo

Dr. Karen DeSalvo is a physician who has served as a leader through her 20-year career toward improving access to affordable, high quality care for all people with a focus on vulnerable populations through her direct care, medical education and administrative roles. Before coming to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, she was the New Orleans Health Commissioner and New Orleans Mayor Mitchell Landrieu’s Senior Health Policy Advisor.

Before joining the Mayor’s administration, Dr. DeSalvo was a professor of medicine and vice dean for community affairs and health policy at Tulane University School of Medicine.

Following Hurricane Katrina, she created an innovative model of neighborhood-based primary care and mental health services for low-income, uninsured and other vulnerable individuals, and was the founder and president of 504HealthNet, a consortium of safety net providers in the New Orleans region.

Dr. DeSalvo served as president of the Louisiana Health Care Quality Forum and the National Association of Chiefs of General Internal Medicine. She has served on the boards of the National Association of County and City Health Officials and the Society of General Internal Medicine.

Dr. DeSalvo was recognized as one of “Women of Excellence in Health Care” by the Louisiana Legislative Women’s Caucus and named a “Children’s Hero” by the Children’s Bureau of New Orleans and Family Service of New Orleans named her as one of their Ten Outstanding Persons. In 2013, Governing Magazine named Dr. DeSalvo one of nine Public Officials of the Year.

She earned her Medical Doctorate and Master’s in Public Health from Tulane University, and Master’s in Clinical Epidemiology from Harvard School of Public Health.

Dr. Karen B. DeSalvo's Latest Blog Posts

Interoperability to help achieve better care, smarter spending, and healthier people

Dr. Karen B. DeSalvo | January 30, 2015

Today, we issued Connecting Health and Care for the Nation: A Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap Version 1.0 (“Roadmap”).  This Roadmap reflects nearly a year of collaborative effort with extensive input from the public and private sectors and is a call to action to see that we can unlock digital health information and see that it can be appropriately used when and where it matters most, to who matters most – the people of this nation.  

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Interoperable Health IT for a Healthy Nation – The 2015 ONC Annual Meeting

Dr. Karen B. DeSalvo | December 18, 2014

We are on track to achieving a collective impact in better health for all by working together as a nation to usher in an interoperable learning health system. In such a health system, health information can be collected, shared, and used – not by the government, but by each individual, their providers, and researchers – to improve public and population health, facilitate important research, inform clinical quality measures and care outcomes, and keep our communities healthy.

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The Federal Strategy For Collecting, Sharing, And Using Electronic Health Information

Dr. Karen B. DeSalvo | December 8, 2014

Making our nation’s health and wellness infrastructure interoperable is a top priority for the Administration, and government plays a vital role in advancing this effort. Federal agencies are purchasers, regulators, and users of health information technology (health IT), as they set policy and insure, pay for care, or provide direct patient care for millions of Americans. They also contribute toward protecting and promoting community health, fund health and human services, invest in infrastructure, as well as develop and implement policies and regulations to advance science and support research.

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